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Branding

Branding, Inspiration

A conversation with the founder of New York Magazine and the man who designed the I ♥ NY logo, the psychedelic Bob Dylan poster, the DC bullet logo used by DC Comics from 1977 to 2005, and the Brooklyn Brewery logo.

Branding, Product Design

Saul Bass' work in logo design and movie title credit sequences spanned the latter half of the 20th century, with prominent work in each field. He worked closely with AT&T, designing not only the 1970 "bell" logo that was ubiquitous for a decade, but also the globe logo unveiled in 1983. One reason for this bell logo's ubiquity? The redesign was the largest corporate re-identity program in the U.S., ever. This film was made by Bass' company as a presentation to AT&T executives. It would have extended to be shown to the public, but a number of his ideas in the film were not ultimately adopted, like his phone booth designs, and men's and women's uniforms. But a great many of the design were adopted—including, most memorably, the telephone vans and hardhat designs of the 1970s. Bass designed down to the details, showcasing in this film a myriad of ideas, like Yellow Pages book designs, cufflinks for executives, and flags.

Branding

Stan is the CEO and Creative Director at Evenson Design Group (EDG). From initially designing album covers for rock and roll and jazz greats such as Peter Frampton, Steve Miller, Tom Petty, Joe Cocker, Tina Turner and the late Dave Brubeck, he has continued to successfully build brands for NFL's New England Patriots, Honda, Epson, Apple, Toyota, Disney, Fox, Universal Studios, Warner Brothers and USC's Shoah Foundation. Stan is honored to have had two design pieces selected to be in the Permanent Collection of the Library of Congress among his countless design and creative direction awards over the years.

Branding

Paula Scher looks back at a life in design (she's done album covers, books, the Citibank logo, etc.) and pinpoints the moments when she really had fun by being serious, and not solemn. Look for gorgeous designs and images from her legendary career.

Branding

Sujata Keshavan, renowned graphic designer and co- founder of Ray & Keshavan India, raised a very important question: "Is there such a thing as an Indian identity?". The main problem in answering that question is the sheer diversity of India, she acknowledged, and the question of whether there can be a common identity. If so, how does it manifest itself, she wondered aloud. To answer all of these questions, Keshavan used the responses of a colleague to images she had shown him, asking him to differentiate the Indian from the non-Indian. The responses prove that we as Indians intuitively and instinctively determine what is Indian and what is not, simply because of the symbols and motifs of Indianess that we have been brought up on. This is through the motifs and symbols which have become popular because of the varied craft and architectural traditions of the country. Keshavan traced the history of India vis a vis urbanisation and development to highlight how the whole concept of an 'Indian' design sensibility could have emerged. Starting from the pre-independent era, when 'to be Indian was to be more like the British', to the nationalist era where Mahatma Gandhi and Nehru rejected colonial policies and introduced Indian symbols in the mainstream to invoke a sense of Indianness, she says, "For them, to be Indian was not to be British". The third era that she pointed out was the post-liberalization in 1991. With the entry of global brands in the Indian markets, Indian manufacturers were forced to improve the quality and design of their own product to ensure that they managed to retain their customer base. This brought about a revolution in the way Indian designed their products. This era also saw the business environments mimic the corporate abroad. The example she used to highlight this point was the new architecture which was becoming popular with the corporate. The design was quite different from the Indian designs till date and most of it ranged from "undistinguishable ordinary to ugly". So, engineering and modern technology came to India and took over. The reason which she quotes for this phenomenon is that Indian identity was suppressed with the telecom revolution. "It should have happened earlier to give us time to acclimatise the changes," she commented. Keshavan points out that India's strength lies in innovation and process design. Speaking on Indian advertising, she commented that with the advent of technology and global brands, the production quality of campaigns has improved; more and more people are being reached but through local languages. Speaking about the prospects of design in India, she affirmed prospects are growing, however slowly, but in too fragmented a manner to be a movement yet. "The economic and political power of the west is declining and it is looking towards India with greater respect," she said, "which is making 'us' less awestruck. " She underlined the fact that Indians need to build up on our strengths, which are an array of infinitely varied and vast crafts traditions: the bedrock of Indian design. Only then will design in India be Indian design, she concluded.